Major Refresh and Updates

Pay no attention to the posting date listed. That date is only used so that the Bugeye posts can be kept in sequence for the reader. The following work was accomplished in the period between July and September 2021. I took the engine and gearbox first, and then later the entire car to my Dad’s home for this work. He has a lift and an air conditioned garage and I am no dummy!

This effort was all motivated by the fact that after about nineteen years the slave cylinder, provided by Bill Perry at Rivergate Restorations for the Datsun 5 speed gearbox, decided to leak and I lost the clutch. Pretty amazing that it lasted that long. Because we used hex head bolts rather than socket cap bolts for the initial installation, I had to remove the engine and gearbox to get to the slave cylinder! Since the engine was out of the car it seemed like the perfect time to do a general cleaning of the engine and refresh other components that also needed attention after almost twenty years.

While the categories are not discreet, rather than discussing the work accomplished chronologically, I will do my best to group the work by function or system within the car.

General

My Dad first undertook a clean up and degreasing of the engine. Not hard but certainly messy.

Electrical

A new battery from Batteries Plus was installed.

The alternator had some oxidation issues and this was removed as much as possible and  a lubricant protectant called TW 25B (used to protect firearm bare metal) was applied.

Bugeye Alternator – Before

 

Bugeye Alternator – After

 

LUBRICANT TW 25B

Rather than having two bolts for the left and right ears of the alternator, a single long bolt and a stainless bushing have been added to enhance the stability of the mounting.

Bugeye Alternator with new Mounting Bushing

The alternator mounting bracket was removed and painted.

Bugeye Alternator Bracket Painted

As was the alternator adjustable swing bracket. Painted with POR-15.

Alternator Swing Bracket, Dip Stick and Water Pump Pulley Painted

The gear reduction, high torque, starter was cleaned, but after painting a new original-type bendix starter was installed.

High Torque Starter – Before

 

High Torque Starter – After

New Starter and Cable

Cooling

Since I am in Florida, I thought it was time switch from a 180 degree thermostat to a 160 degree.

180 degree original thermostat

Also installed a new thermostat housing sourced from Bugeyeguy using Permatex Water Pump & Thermostat Housing Gasket Maker and a new gasket.

Permatex Gasket Maker

Thermostat Housing

Ignition

We replaced the spark plugs with the same brand and type that were in the engine when it was delivered from Rivergate. These were Autolite #4164 gapped to .25″. We may switch these out later after we do some more research on the subject. A little anti-seize was applied to the plug threads.

Autolite 4164 Spark Plugs

The Bugeye uses a Crane XR700 “FIREBALL” electronic ignition system that employs an optical sensing technology. The unit is still sold in 2021 but the technology is now owned by a new company and is now called FAST XR700. It has been in the car for close to twenty years and still functions properly. This photo shows the internal components of the system in place:

Crane XR700 Electronic Ignition

The distributor and wiring were removed and cleaned. The distributor is secured with a mounting plate. Loosening the large screw on the right side of the clamp allows one to rotate the distributor to retard or advance the timing. If the screw is loosened sufficiently the distributor can be pulled out of its housing and removed. If this is done, care must be taken to mark the distributor and the mounting plate so that the distributor can be returned to the same position without effecting the ignition timing. 

Distributor Clamp

Distributor Timing Position Mark

Alternatively, the distributor can be left in the mounting plate to avoid any chance of effecting the ignition timing and the distributor and the mounting plate can be removed as one, together, by loosening two 1/4″ hex head bolts that secure the mounting plate to the engine block. The LH (rear) bolt is a bit hard to access. A crow’s foot wrench or a custom made tool helps to do the job.

Modified 7/16 wrench to Remove Distributor

Distributor and wiring Before Cleaning

The distributor can only be installed into the engine block one way. The drive dog at the bottom of the distributor shaft must align with the fitting in the engine oil pump drive. It doesn’t show well in this photo, but the slots in the fitting are off center. If the crank is turned it is possible to get the timing out 180 degrees so care must be taken to make sure these stay aligned.

Oil Pump distributor drive fitting

Distributor Assembly Cleaned and Polished

Upon reinstalling the distributor in the motor I also installed a new rotor, top loading distributor cap and new ignition wires from the cap to the spark plugs. Unfortunately, I didn’t get a photo of this.

It is, of course, important when replacing the ignition wires that the wire on the number one firing position on the distributor cap gets connected to the number one cylinder spark plug. The firing order of the engine is 1-3-4-2 in a counterclockwise rotation

Gearbox

The gearbox casing was degreased and painted.

 

Tube Shock Conversion

The original Armstrong lever shocks on my Bugeye were completely worn out and due for rebuilding or replacement. The rears were particularly bad making for a very “hard” ride. The questions was, should they be rebuilt or replaced with one of the tube shock conversion kits available from the usual Bugeye vendors. My dad installed a Bilstein tube shock conversion kit from Putzke’s on his Bloody Beast AH 3000 and was very happy with it and since Udo Putzke also designed a kit for the Bugeye I decided that it would be a nice Christmas present from my dad! Fortunately, he concurred and right after Christmas on December 26, 2015 we started the install.

Frankly, Udo’s instructions (clicking will download the instructions) could be a little more detailed, but we were able to successfully figure things out.

First we laid out all of the parts that came with the kit. Most everything is self explanatory with the exception of the spacers. Left side components were marked with red circular stickers and the right side components were marked with green circular stickers. 

Putzke's Bugeye Bilstein Shock Kit Components

Putzke’s Bugeye Bilstein Shock Kit Components

 

Understandably, Udo’s kit assumes a stock Bugeye. If you have made modifications like I have, these modifications can create installation conflicts with the new shocks or their mounting brackets. The first one I encountered was the upgraded anti-sway bar installed on my car. It interfered with the lower mounting bracket. I noticed, as you can see in the following photo, that I may have been driving a little too hard in some auto-crosses! Bent anti-sway bar bracket. For now I removed the anti-sway bar bracket. I will find a solution to this issue after the shocks are installed. I also encountered a conflict in the front upper mounts with my radiator overflow tank that will need to be relocated at some point.

Bent Anti-sway bar mounting bracket

Bent Anti-sway bar mounting bracket

Coolant Overflow Tank

Coolant Overflow Tank

Front Shock Installation – Lower Mount:

1. Pulled the emergency brake and locked the rear wheels.

2. Loosened the wheel nuts on the front wheels, jacked the car up and supported with jack stands and then removed the front wheels/tires.

3. Loosened (don’t remove) the two bolts that hold the the lower spring plate to the front A-arm.

4. Remove one bolt – frame side/inboard.

A-arm Bolt Replacement

A-arm Bolt Replacement

5. Place the new bottom bracket and long spacer on top of the A-arm. Replace the bolt and nut with one supplied in the kit. Tighten until metal contact.

6. Remove the wheel side/outboard bolt.

7. Insert the spacer and rate the bracket over the hole.

LH Front Lower Mounitng Plate and Spacer

LH Front Lower Mounting Plate and Spacer

LH Front Lower Mounting Plate

LH Front Lower Mounting Plate

8.Replace second new bolt/nut.

9. Check spring clearance and pull bracket away from spring.

10. Tighten both bolts to 19lbs.

Front Shock Installation – Upper Mount:

1. Support the lower control arm with a floor jack.

2. Remove three (3) from the Armstrong lever shock. At least in my case, I had to remove the big heater inlet hose to get to the shock bolts.

Removing Armstrong Shock Mounting Bolts

Removing Armstrong Shock Mounting Bolts

3. Remove the oil plug (big hex nut) from the Armstrong shock and take the valving out.

4. Reinstall oil plug and tighten, check and refill oil.

5. Checked the threads on the shock tower to make sure they were clean and in good shape. As Udo’s directions say, “Bad threads must be repaired!”

6. Clean threads with brake cleaner and Use Locktite on threads.

7. Install the original equipment shock with the new bracket on top using the original bolts.

8. Tighten all three (3) bolts to 30 lb.ft.

9. Install the Bilstein shock #F4-BE3-E553-T0 and tighten to 30 lb.ft. (top and bottom)

10. Install the wheels/tires and set the car on the ground.

Udo emphasizes that if you have adjustment plates installed, you must check the camber, caster and toe on the car!

RH Front Shock Installed

RH Front Shock Installed

Rear Shock Installation:

The rear shock installation is much easier than the front. We already had the car off the ground and on jack stands with the rear tires/wheels removed.

1.Removed both the LH and RH rear Armstrong Lever Shocks.

Armstrong Shock with Lever to be Removed

Armstrong Shock with Lever to be Removed

2.Installed the three spacers for the new mount bracket and one new bolt provided with the kit. Torqued nuts to 33 lb/ft.

Armstrong Shock Removed with Spacers in Place

Armstrong Shock Removed with Spacers in Place

RH Tube Shock Bracket in place

RH Tube Shock Bracket in place

3.Installed the rear shock F4-BE3-E554-T0 to the top bracket pin and torqued to 33 lb. ft.

Bilstein Shock Upper Mount

Bilstein Shock Upper Mount

4.Installed the step-down spacer on the lower mounting and torqued to 33 lb. ft.

RH Bilstein Shock Lower Mount on Axle

RH Bilstein Shock Lower Mount on Axle

5. Complete other side. Inspect your work and then reinstall wheels/tires and lower to the ground.

RH Bilstein Shock Mounted

RH Bilstein Shock Mounted

RH Bilstein Shock Mounted

RH Bilstein Shock Mounted

6. Take out for a test drive!

Post installation assessment: Udo’s shocks don’t turn the Bugeye into a Cadillac boulevard cruiser – but then we wouldn’t want that now would we :-). However, the ride is much improved (particularly in the rear) as compared to the admittedly worn out Armstrongs. One cannot really compare the two since we have exhausted lever shocks and brand new tube shocks. The test is always “would you spend the time and money and do it again,” and we think the answer is “yes.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storing the Original 948cc Motor

Engine & GearboxMy Dad built a new house and he is “downsizing,” so some car parts are needing to go to a storage unit. When we upgraded to a 1275 motor and Datsun 5-speed gearbox, we kept the original 948cc. I will never plan to go back to the 948, but if the car is ever sold it will be nice to have the original numbers-matching engine. Apparently, the original gearbox was replaced with the ribcase box somewhere in its history..He has a climate controlled unit, but the motor and gearbox needed to be put away properly so he built a nice plywood box for the storage unit.

Fluids were drained, and Marvel Mystery Oil squirted into each cylinder. Desiccant plugs were purchased from Moss Motors and installed in place of the Champions. Holes were plugged and the top of the box was screwed in place. Who knows when this motor and gearbox will see the light of day again!

Desiccant Plugs

Desiccant Plugs

Backplate Brace

Backplate Brace

Tucked in for the Night

Tucked in for the Night

Engine Storage Box

Engine Storage Box

New Tires & Fuel Pump

I am a little late recording this, but in September 2010 the Bugeye’s shoes were replaced. While the tread on the Wynstar tires looked just fine, they were over eight years old, so for safety sake it was time to replace them. The same tire was no longer available, so the Bugeye now has some P185/60R13 80 H Sumit HTR 200. These tires are not the same low profile as the Wynstars, but the ride is superior and the grip firmer than before. Details are available on the maintenance page of this site.

The Sprite was neglected a bit over this winter, so when a warm day came round near the end of February, it was time to start her up and give her a good run. Alas, no joy! Either the SU fuel pump was not sucking fuel or there was a clog in the line. After a few diagnostics, it became clear the fuel pump was the culprit. A negative ground electronic SU was ordered from Moss Motors and installed. While messing with the pump, it seemed the ideal time to switch out the old rubber fuel hose for a new hose that is no susceptible to deterioration from ethanol. That done, the Bugeye is now happy and running once again!

Fuel Pump Installed

Fuel Pump Installed

Fuel Pump Installed

Fuel Pump Installed

SU Fuel Pump Part Number

SU Fuel Pump Part Number

2008 Encounter

Ready to AutocrossThe Austin-Healey Sports and Touring Club – A Car Club for Healey, Austin-Healey, and Austin-Healey Sprite Owners and Enthusiasts with regions in New York, Pennsylvania, Delaware and New Jersey always puts on a great annual event referred to as “Encounter.” The event is held in August of each year.  A judged Concours, popular vote car show, a rallye, tech sessions, a gymkhana, funkhana, valve cover races and a flea market are just a few of the usual events. Click the image to the left to view a slide show of the 2008 event held in Carlisle, PA.

My dad and I attended this year. I drove the Bugeye and he drove the “Bloody Beast,” his recently restored 1960 Austin Healey 3000 BT7, from Harrisonburg. We couldn’t attend when the event got started, but we headed up to Carlisle at about 5:30 am Friday morning, attended activities on Friday and Saturday and headed home Sunday morning. We enjoyed the great weather, and had a wonderful time. I had fun at Del Border’s gymkhana course and the “Bloody Beast” took home first place in the MK I category for the popular car show.

Just Arriving

Just Arriving

Ready To Run

Ready To Run

This is a little video of one of my Gymkhana exploits. I missed a gate, but what the heck. I had a lot of fun and that is what it is all about.

The Hotel Carlisle also hosted the owners of a number of modified trucks the weekend of Encounter, as they were having a show of their own at the Carlisle Fair Grounds. This photo shows one “Encounter” between a Healey 100 and one of the trucks.

Monster Truck

Monster Truck

The famous female race car driver, Janet Guthrie, was the featured speaker of Encounter 2008. One of the topics of her remarks was the Sebring Sprite. This is a photo of one of those Sebring Sprites.

Guthrie Sprite

Guthrie Sprite

 

A New (And Proper) Master Cylinder

Although I had converted the front drum brakes to disc brakes not long after purchasing the Bugeye, I had not been able to find the proper 3/4” piston version that would have been used on the 1098 cars. My dad was able to source one from California during the previous winter, and in early August he installed it. He ordered the new master cylinder from Gerard Chateauvieux at Gerard’s Garage http://www.gerardsgarage.com Both the clutch and the brake master bores are 3/4″. The push rods are also shorter than the originals. More information is available from theses two pdf files:

Disc Brake Upgrade

BrakeCylinder.com– Midget Sprite Spridget Master Cylinders Disc Brake Upgrade

After bleeding the brakes and clutch we did end up with improved brake pedal feel and stopping power. He removed the entire pedal box, installed the new master and then re-installed the pedal box.

Master Cylinder

Master Cylinder

2006 Gettysburg Car Show

The regional MG club held a popular show (no judging – just display) in Gettysburg, PA. Tyler, Scott, Dad and I attended. I drove to Gettysburg with Tyler navigating. It took us about 2 hours and 40 minutes. The show was held at a shopping mall but they had a great display area set up like a Main Street. It was a short show, 9:30 – 1:30 but we had a good time and saw some nice cars. Three Bugeyes were in attendance and approximately a dozen big healeys from the Capital Area Healey Club.

Grandson with Bugeye in Gettysburg

Grandson with Bugeye in Gettysburg

Gas Struts

Gas Struts

Gas Struts

Gas Struts

Gas Struts

Gas Struts

A Functioning Horn

The Horns

The horn had not worked in the Bugeye since we bought it – not very safe since the bugeye is one of the smallest things on the road. It was time to fix it. The horn itself when tested sounded very weak so I ordered a Hella twin tone horn kit. It came with mounting brackets and a relay for the price of $23.00!

Hella twin note horns

Hella Twin Note Horns

Horn wiring diagram

Horn Wiring Diagram

My horn button is a little different from the original since I have a Moto-Lita wheel, but I ordered a new push pin for it – the 948 Bugeye variety. The pin needs to go into the wheel with the plastic end toward the dash so that the pin is insulated from the body of the aluminum wheel hub. Then the brass sprung pick up on the back of the horn button needs to line up with the pin. The entire assembly then pushes into the wheel hub. A brown wire from the brass contact ring on the dash cone runs to the horn relay.

Horn Button Contact

Horn Button Contact

Steering Hub and Push Pin

Steering Hub and Push Pin

I decided to mount both of the horns on the right front lower side of the frame. That way it was not necessary to run wiring across the frame below the radiator. On one horn I used the original mounting bracket, and on the other I used the supplied brackets and drilled two holes into the fresh air hose mounting assembly. I mounted the relay just above the horns.

Hella Horns Mounting Location

Hella Horns Mounting Location

Horn Relay Mount

Horn Relay Mount

The wiring diagram provided on the box of the horn was helpful. I provided a separate ground wire for each horn. The brown ground wire from the wheel  was connected to terminal #85 on the relay. The green wire form the fuse panel was connected to terminal #86. A red wire was used to connect terminal #87 on the relay to the positive terminal on each horn. This required putting a twin bullet connecter on the wire from the relay to splice a second wire to go the 2nd horn. Finally, a blue wire was run from the non-switched side of the fuse block to the relay terminal #30 to complete the circuit.

The horn now works great! It sounds like the biggest car on the road.

The Rear View Mirror

The rear view mirror in the Bugeye wasn’t the original and it looked a little worse for wear so I replaced it with a new one from Moss. It wasn’t easy to get to the mounting screws because of the rake of the windscreen, so I bent a screw driver with a torch to make a tool that would do the trick. Worked like a charm!

New Rear View Mirror

New Rear View Mirror

New Tool

New Tool

Flashlight

We used to carry a magnetic mounting flashlight under the cowl, but it never stayed very well. We picked up a mounting bracket for a light at VIR and I finally got around to installing it in the car. I selected the left rear mudguard as the location.

Flashlight Mounting

Flashlight Mounting

 

 

Dash Fascia and Gauges

When we bought the Bugeye, it came with a working tachometer and a dead speedometer. After thinking about having the original instruments refurbished or buying new ones I decided to buy new Smith’s gauges. Keeping the original tach would have involved installing the guts of an electric tach into the casing of the old gauge since we had previously installed an alternator making the original worthless since it had a mechanical drive off the back of the dynamo.

So the new gauges were ordered from APT Instruments, but it would be terrible to install them in the old dash so replacing old vinyl with new naugahyde was the only thing to do! I began the removal of the dash and proceeded slowly, carefully labeling the wiring to each instrument or switch.

I initially disconnected 2 orange/yellow braided wires to the wiper washer pump. Using a micro switch, my dad had previously converted the manual pump for the windscreen washer to an electric pump. Next was the heater switch. I disconnected a green/brown wire from the harness from a black wire to the heater switch. Then I disconnected a black wire from the heater switch body from a double bullet connector into a light green wire.

Washer Wiring

Washer Wiring

Washer Wiring

Washer Wiring

Heater Wiring

Heater Wiring

Heater Switch Wiring

Heater Switch Wiring

The turn signal wiring was next. The switch has three spade connectors. On the side with tow spades, a yellow wire attached to one and a blue wire to the other. A white wire was disconnected from the side of the switch with the single spade.

turn signal switch

turn signal switch

The Ignition Switch followed. The switch had four screw terminals. The top right terminal had 2 red wires joined together. The top left terminal had 1 heavy gauge yellow wire. The bottom right terminal had two white wires joined together and an red fused wire from the the electric fan switch that had been added. Finally, a large blue wire was disconnected the bottom left terminal. A previous owner had fabricated a clamping system to hold the ignition switch in place, that while primitive, did work. It will be replaced later.

Ignition Switch Wiring

Ignition Switch Wiring

Ignition Switch

Ignition Switch

Gauge Lights. Wiring for most gauges is red. The oil/water temperature gauge light fit into the retaining bracket sleeve. The tach light was also red, but this wire was ultimately discarded as it was not needed for the lighting for the new tach.

Oil and Tach Lighting

Oil and Tach Lighting

Oil & Water Temp

Oil & Water Temp

Tach lamp wiring

Tach Lamp Wiring

Speedometer Lamp Wiring

Speedometer Lamp Wiring

Wiper Switch. Disconnected the dark blue wire with a soldered tip from the right screw terminal, and the black wire from the left terminal.

Fuel Gauge wiring. One black ground wire was removed from the retaining bracket. A red/white wire for the lamp to the retaining bracket, a green wire to the left terminal and a green/black wire to the right terminal were all disconnected.

Fuel Gauge Wiring

Fuel Gauge Wiring

Panel Lamp Switch.

The panel lamp switch had three wires. Two red/white wires were joined and connected to the right terminal and 1 red wire was disconnected from the left terminal.

Panel Lamp Switch

Panel Lamp Switch

Radiator Fan Switch

Radiator Fan Switch

The radiator electric fan switch

Has three wires: the black ground wire was removed from the top spade terminal, the blue power wire from the switch to the fan itself was removed from the middle spade and the red wire with fuse to the ignition was also disconnected.

The Horn

Had one brown wire from the horn trim ring to the horn itself. The wire was disconnected at the bullet connector.

After removing the starter button and cable, the choke cable and the heater air control assembly cable, and the grab handle, the dash was removed from the car. Two ¼” hex head bolts secured the dash to the body on the left and right side. Two chrome phillips head screws fastened through two brackets from the firewall to the dash and finally one nut is fastened to a stud located centrally at the top of the dash.

Recovered Dash

Then it was time to recover the dash. I purchased some naugahyde at a local fabrics store and some contact cement and went to work. This is the result:

Fresh New Look

Fresh New Look

Reupholstered Dash

Reupholstered Dash

Horn Ring

Horn Ring

Reupholstered Dash

Reupholstered Dash

The new tach and speedometer

While not original design, the new tach certainly looks period. The tach required some new electrical connections.  One wire connected to the coil, another to the fused power block and one to ground. These are the installation instructions:Electronic Tachometer Installation Instructions

Smiths Electronic Tach

Smiths Electronic Tach

tach coil connection

tach coil connection

Tach Fused Power

Tach Fused Power

Tach Ground

Tach Ground

Coil White Wire

Coil White Wire

Finished Dash Installed

Finished Dash Installed

Demister Hoses

The old paper demister hoses had holes in them and obviously did not work well. With the dash off it was the perfect time to install some new hoses.

Left Side Hose

Left Side Hose

Right Side Hose

Right Side Hose

Aluminum Racing Pedals

My dad had installed racing pedals in the Big Healey and thought they did give a better pedal feel in addition to looking cool, so I bought a set for the Bugeye as well. They do look nice. I did not use the racing pedal for the accelerator pedal as it was just too close to the brake.

Engine Clean-up and Reinstall

Engine Install

Engine Install

One of the things I wanted to accomplish with the engine clean-up was to have the  exhaust header coated to reduce heat in the engine compartment and interior. I used Swain Coatings. The header came back looking great. Time will tell if the coating holds up and is effective in reducing heat.

Swain Coat Header

Swain Coat Header

Swain Coat Header

Swain Coat Header

I also did a general cleaning of the engine including a new paint job while the gearbox was being worked on by Jack Harper. I replaced the oil sump gasket and the rocker cover gasket, too. I tested and reinstalled the gear reduction starter. The air cleaners were cleaned and oiled with K&N products.

Clean Motor Assembly

Clean Motor Assembly

Clean Motor Assembly

Clean Motor Assembly

I developed the following list of items for reinstalling the engine and gearbox into the Bugeye:

Reinstalling a Bugeye Engine and Datsun 5-speed Transmission

  1. Grease the shaft splines on the engine and the yoke before installing the engine.
  2. Set the exhaust header in place so that it will be positioned to install once the engine is tightened into its mounts.
  3. Guide the motor into place with the lift so that the yoke on the driveshaft lines up with the transmission. If this does not work then remove the driveshaft and install after the engine and transmission are in place.
  4. Loosely secure the engine to the front motor mounts. The mounts themselves should be loose then tightened after all bolts/nuts are in place.
  5. Install the long bolts up through the crossmember into the rear transmission mount and tighten.
  6. Tighten the front engine mounts.
  7. Center the transmission in the rear mount, then push it as far to the right as possible, and tighten the transmission pad mounts on the bracket.
  8. Install the bolts in the sides of the transmission rear mounts from inside the car with the self locking nuts inside the tunnel. (Hint: tape the nuts in the wrench to make starting the threads easier.)
  9. Replace the gearshift lever.
  10. Connect the ground strap to the frame of the car.
  11. Replace the rocker cover and connect the breather hose.
  12. Install the intake and exhaust manifolds.
  13. Install heat shield and carbs.
  14. Connect throttle and choke cables.
  15. Connect breather hose.
  16. Connect hot water hose to copper tube and connect to radiator hose. Tighten clamps. It is easier to put the clamp on the hose/copper pipe when the copper pipe clips are loose from the manifold.
  17. Connect the short hot water hose from the water control valve to the heater.
  18. Connect the electrical cable from the gear reduction starter to the starter solenoid.
  19. Connect the oil pressure pipe to the fitting on the engine block by the banjo bolt.
  20. Reconnect the white/black line from the electronic ignition to the distributor.
  21. Connect the high tension line from the distributor to the coil.
  22. Reconnect the plastic terminal (3 wires) to the alternator.
  23. Connect the fuel line from the fuel pump to the carbs.
  24. Reattach the water temperature sensor to the engine head.
  25. Remove the banjo bolt where the oil line exits the rear of the block. Pour motor oil down the hole in the block to prime the oil pump. Reinstall the bolt.
  26. Remove the oil filter and pour it full of motor oil and reinstall.
  27. Fill engine with oil – Castrol GTX 10W-40.
  28. Fill the gearbox with Gear lube – Redline MT90. 2 1/4 pints. Use long clear plastic tube. Try pump.
  29. Connect the stainless steel flex line from the master cylinder to the slave cylinder.
  30. Bleed the clutch slave cylinder. (See Page 9 of Rivergate’s manual)
  31. Install radiator and fill with 50% coolant and 50% distilled water.
  32. Fix the carb drain lines to the mounting clamp at the lower rear of the engine compartment.
  33. Insert the 1 ½” connecter pipe (with sealant) for the exhaust system into the header pipe.
  34. Install the exhaust and muffler assembly.
  35. Tighten clamps on the exhaust connecter pipe.
  36. Reconnect the battery cables.
  37. When ready to start the engine, pull the spark plugs and spin the engine with the starter until the oil pressure goes up to normal on the pressure gauge, and stays.
  38. Check for any oil, coolant and fuel leaks.
  39. Reinstall the spark plugs and start engine.
  40. If engine does not start turn distributor 180 and try again!
  41. Install 4” fresh air heater hose and clamp.
  42. Install the leather shifter cover and surround.

Start It Up And Have Some Fun!

I Know It Fits!

I Know It Fits!

Motor Protection!

Motor Protection!

 

Engine Install

Engine Install