Alfa Hose Clamp Inventory

I should first note that at this point in time, the content of this post is incomplete. To complete the project I will need the assistance of other Alfa owners, and I expect that the help will be received over time rather than immediately.

Early in my work with my 1987 Quadrifoglio I decided to try to inventory all of the various type and size hose clamps used throughout the car, but primarily in the fuel, emissions and vacuum systems. I have used diagrams taken from the service manual as well as a narrative listing to identify the hose clamps and their location. The numbers added to the diagrams reflect the numbering sequence used in my narrative summary. What I identify in this post is current as of February 17, 2021.

Romablok clamp

The hose clamps used by Alfa-Romeo were manufactured by Romablok, but they are no longer made. The feature of these clamps that is important to maintain is that they wrap all the way around the hose and tighten 360 degrees. The also have a smoother outside edge with an external screw and a flat solid band so as to not cut into the hose.

I began my effort by visually inspecting the engine bay and then moved to the trunk and then finally under the car.

OVS upper port clamp #1 (26) to cam cover breather fitting clamp #2 (26)

OVS large lower port clamp #3 (26) to the rubber air duct clamp #4 (22)

Throttle body clamp #5 (20) to the thermostat clamp #6 (20)

Rubber air duct clamp #7 (20) to the AAV clamp #8 (20)

AAV clamp #9 (20) to the plenum chamber clamp #10 (20)

Rubber air duct clamp #11 (17) to the plenum chamber clamp #12 (17)

Throttle body clamp #13 (18) to the heater water valve clamp #14 (?)

Check valve at plenum chamber clamp #15 (19) to the brake booster clamp #16 (19)

Rubber air duct clamp #17(20) to the canister clamp #18 (?)

Fuel filler upper clamp #19 (66) to fuel filler lower clamp #20 (66)

Fuel Delivery from tank to fuel rail

A rubber fuel hose from the secondary fuel pump connects with clamp #21 (15-17) to a fuel hard pipe in the trunk with clamp #22 (15-17). The fuel hard pipe passes through the rear trunk bulkhead to a 3-4” piece of rubber fuel hose and is clamped with #23 (15-17). This short rubber fuel hose connects to another hard pipe with clamp #24 (15-17). This fuel hard pipe is covered with a rubber fuel hose as a sheath for the metal pipe.

The fuel hard pipe runs along the underside of the car toward the fuel pump. The covered fuel hard pipe is connected to a rubber fuel hose with clamp #25 (?). The rubber fuel hose, configured in the shape of an “S” connects to the input port on the fuel pump with clamp #26 (?).  A rubber fuel hose connects to the output port on the fuel pump with clamp #27 (12-14), travels to the fuel filter input port and is connected with clamp #28 (12-14). The same size rubber fuel hose connects to the output port of the fuel filter with clamp #29 (12-14) and connects to the fuel hard pipe (encased in a rubber sheath) with clamp # 30 (12-14) that is directed along the frame rail to the engine bay and to the fuel injector rail where it is secured with clamp #31 (12-14). A short rubber fuel hose from the fuel injector rail secured with clamp #32 (12-14) connects to the cold start injector and is secured with clamp #33 (12-14).

Fuel Return to Tank

A rubber fuel hose from the fuel pressure regulator with clamp #34 (12-14) to rubber fuel hose that travels under the car to a junction with a fuel return hard pipe covered with a rubber sheath. The hose is secured with clamp #35 (12-14) on the engine side and with clamp #36 (12-14) on the rear axle side. The pipe then travels over the axle to the rear trunk bulkhead where it is joined by clamp #37 (12-14) to a three inch piece of rubber fuel hose. The other end of the short piece of hose is clamped #38 (12-14) to the fuel return hard pipe that exits through the bulkhead into the trunk. The fuel hard pipe runs along the back of the trunk where it joins with a rubber fuel hose with clamp #39 (12-14). The rubber fuel hose terminates at the return pipe fitting on the fuel tank and is secured with clamp # 40 (12-14).

Fuel Supply Circuit & Evaporative Emission Control System

Plenum Chamber

 

Evaporative emission control system

Clamp #41 (13-15)  secures a rubber fuel hose to the evaporative emission outlet pipe at the fuel tank. The hose routes to the rear of the trunk where it connects to the LH lower side of the expansion tank with clamp #42 (13-15).

A rubber emissions hose exits the expansion tank on the LH upper side and is reduced to a smaller diameter rubber hose. The two hoses are connected with two clamps: clamp #43 (13-15) and clamp #44 (13-15).

The smaller diameter hose wraps around the expansion tank and joins a “T” fitting with no clamps. A vent valve is joined at the “T.” The smaller hose then merges with a larger hose with a check valve and then rejoins with a smaller rubber hose and then a still smaller clear hose that seems to exit the trunk behind the LH rear shock absorber. I don’t know where it goes. There is also a fairly large diameter black hose in the same location. I don’t know what it does or where it goes.

I did not open the panel in the front RH wheel well to inspect the charcoal canister. The clear hose connects with the canister. I do not know if it uses a clamp or not, but I will call it clamp #45 (?). As stated earlier, a rubber hose feeds air from the rubber air duct #17(20) to the canister #18 (?). The intake air duct feeds air to the canister via a rubber hose with clamp #46 (?) at the canister and clamp #47 (?) at the air duct fitting.

Cooling system
I need to finish looking at these.

 

 

 

 

Alfa Oil Vapor Separator (OVS)

The OVS on the Alfa has been a well discussed topic on the ALFA Bulletin Board. Apparently it is a component that is subject to failure, although in fairness, I don’t expect that Alfa engineers ever expected this part to last over thirty years! The part is susceptible  to corrosion – often suffering pin hole leaks, rotted out internals and clogged lines. 

Richard Lesniewicz aka “divotandtralee” a contributor to the Bulletin Board, studied the problem and designed and partially manufactured a replacement for the original unit. The new OVS is entirely brass and Richard machined the individual components of the assembly and sold them as a kit to be assembled by the purchaser. “Assembly” in this case is primarily soldering. The new OVS is almost identical in size to the original and once painted black will be almost indistinguishable once mounted in the engine bay.

Richard sketched the OVS to first demonstrate how it functions and then to show what happens to it after extended use:

OVS Diagram

Problems with Used OVS

This is a link to his instructions for assembly and use:OVS Construction Instructions 

It is important to align the tubes off of the primary canister in the same fashion as the original OVS. Since that is still on the car, I will wait until I remove it to complete the “construction” of the brass OVS. The following image shows my progress to date:

Rose OVS

 

 

Alfa Ownership & Maintenance Blog

February 15, 2021

70,747 miles on the odometer

In the last ten days or so I have tracked some of the low hanging fruit to fix on Alfie, I have continued my cleaning – but this time under the car, and I decided to trace the fuel system and vacuum hoses to inventory the types and sizes of hose clamps used on the car. Most of the original hose clamps are still on the car but a number have been replaced and usually with cheap inappropriate clamps. The clamp inventory project turned out to require a bigger effort and time commitment than I thought. I will make this the subject of a separate category and post at this location: https://valvechatter.com/?cat=2043.

I ordered an upper radiator hose and installed it only to discover that the radiator leak must be from the top of the tank rather than from a perished old hose! This will require some further attention, but it looks like either a radiator repair or replacement is in my future.

The handbrake did not function at all so I undertook a fault finding mission and the restoration of braking. As it turned out, the handbrake mechanism located at the rear of the differential was rusted in place and frozen preventing the operation of the brakes. 

This is a photo of the original cable mechanism. As the center cable is pulled (at the top in the image) when the handbrake arm is lifted, the two brackets with the LH and RH cables (in the middle of the swivel arms) are supposed to pivot and pull the drum brake cables tight. However, mine was rusted and frozen in place and consequently did not operate properly. 

Handbrake Center Cable Mechanism Mounted

I ordered a new mechanism from Centerline International and installed it on the car. The original part number is 605.17074 with Centerline’s order number being BC420. The item was $59.50.

Alfa Center Brake Cable

After removing the old assembly, I took the opportunity to clean up the differential a bit more  and I painted the two steel mounting blocks just to prevent them from further rusting.

Handbrake Assembly Mounts

I then installed the new assembly. I applied synthetic grease to the rotating components. Yes, that really nasty looking brake pipe is one of the next few items that will get my attention!

Handbrake Assembly Installed

At the other end of the cable I attached a new fork to the handbrake lever with a cleaned-up clevis pin and new split pin. The cable slides through a threaded fixture on the car chassis. It is the red item in the photo below. The cylindrical device is a rotary adjuster that is used to tighten/loosen the slack in the primary center cable.

brake cable adjuster

The first step in actually adjusting the handbrake is to place something heavy on the handbrake handle to keep it down (depressed) while making alterations to the system. I then lifted the rear of the car so as to remove both rear wheels/tires. This makes the rear brake rotors accessible. The handbrake works by expanding two small brake shoes inside the drum (rotor). There is a star adjustment wheel inside the drum that expands and contracts the shoes against the drum surface. Using a screwdriver the star adjuster can be moved toward the front of the car (loosen/contract) or toward the rear of the car (tighten/expand).

After removing the disc brake caliper one can loosen and remove two screws and then pull away the rotor/drum – AFTER CONTRACTING THE SHOES. However, in my case it was not necessary to remove the caliper and rotor drum. Because the handbrake is almost exclusively used when the car is stationary, the shoes actually have very little wear.

Rear Brake Rotor & Handbrake Drum

Brake Shoe Adjustment Wheel

Turning the Adjustment Wheel

I then turned the adjustment wheel on both the LH and RH wheels to fully tighten the shoes against the drum. I then loosened each adjustment wheel three clicks. This enables the wheels to turn freely or perhaps with just a slight friction or rub. Once this is accomplished, the next step is to turn the cylindrical cable adjuster to tighten (not overly) the center pull cable for the brakes. This process resulted in my handbrake working fully on the third click on the brake pawl.

I then reinstalled both rear wheels/tires and torques the lug nuts to 70 ft. lbs. I then tested the handbrake in the driveway and again after a short test drive and concluded that one more task could be checked off the list! 

The rubber door buffer on the RH door was broken and deteriorating. I ordered a replacement from Classic Alfa part number RB061 for $7.10 and installed it by removing two Phillips head screws from a threaded captured plate pin the rear of the door.

Rubber door buffer

Rubber Door Buffer Installed

The Alfa has power mirrors on each door. They are controlled by a small switch with a rotational stalk on the center console and each mirror is selected by turning a ring with a selector tab to one side or the other. Alfie was missing the selector ring but I was able to find one (and a spare) from a fellow Alfa owner who frequents the Alfa Bulletin Board. The little ring must be carefully positioned on the switch and then pressed into place. Once installed Alfie’s mirrors both functioned properly!

Power mirror control

Power Mirror Switch

Power Mirror Selector Ring

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 31, 2021

70,735 miles on the odometer

After a longer than expected storage at the Madison Automotive Apprentices Shop in Harrisonburg, VA I finally transported Alfie to our home in Florida. We don’t really have the space for him, but we will make do. I need a project, Alfie needs some work and the time is right!

Passport Transport (Camille) moved the car to Florida. The process took about four days. here is a shot of the car being unloaded in Bradenton.

Passport Transport Delivering Alfie to Florida

Alfie Unloaded in Bradenton

While he looked good in the Florida sunshine, he was actually quite dirty. He started just fine. The brakes felt a little squishy, but I drove Alfie the 2-3 miles home from the delivery point.

The first thing I did was wash, polish (with a buffer) and wax the car just so it had some protection and, of course, he looks a lot better too. I then began a process of inspection and discovery to see what worked properly and what did not. I began with the interior and exterior while the car was on the ground and then followed that with putting it on the garage lift to clean and inspect the underside. I took literally hundreds of photos and made a few videos of the entire car. I can use these to compare my car to others and to answer my own questions about how things were BEFORE I started tearing things apart. My experience with this is that you can never have enough photos. More is always better.

After Wash and Wax

I was pleased, and surprised to find that most things electrical worked as they should. A few needed some cleaning and coaxing such as the courtesy lamps. I have spent a lot of time on the Alfa Romeo Bulletin Board and learned a great deal. One of the contributors suggested that I should snap the door jamb switches a few times and spray them with some electronics contact cleaner. I did just that, and like magic the courtesy lights are now working! 

I am sure that I will discover many other items that need attention but this is my first list of things that need to be addressed. Should be fun!

  1. The upper radiator hose leaks. I installed a new heavy duty clamp and really cranked it down but it still leaks so I have ordered a new hose to try it before I conclude that I have a radiator problem.
  2. Both power windows are slow (probably from lack of use), and the driver side window will only operate with the door open suggesting that I may have a wiring issue in the door jamb where the wires pass from the body to the door.
  3. Both of the door upper trim pieces need to be replaced – especially the RH side.
  4. The car has a fairly strong fuel smell that seems to be emanating from the trunk as opposed to the engine bay.
  5. The car is missing its radiator shroud. I have a new one to install at some point.
  6. I need to locate the water temperature sensor that is typically located on the shroud.
  7. The dash pad has a couple of bad cracks on the top – very common.
  8. The windshield is slightly fogged on the “A” post LH side.
  9. The front license plate mount is still on the car. A front plate is not required in Florida so I will remove the bracket.
  10. I do not know the age of the fuel hose and vacuum lines in the engine or from the fuel tank to the front of the car. These will all need to be replaced. Most of the hose clamps look pretty well used or weathered so I will look into replacing them as well.
  11. The mirror control switch is missing its bezel that allows the operator to select the LH or RH mirror for adjustment. These apparently break fairly easily and they are hard to find. I located a couple and have ordered them.
  12. The front, under dash speakers appear to be Alfa originals – at least the speaker grilles have the Alfa Romeo name. They don’t sound very good so I may see if I can find some improved speakers that can use the same grilles. There are also some rear speakers located on the rear parcel shelf that are not working.
  13. There is a lamp at the rear view mirror. I really do not know how it operates so I will need to explore that a bit more.
  14. The speedometer needle does twitch especially at lower speed so I may need to look at the cable?
  15. The heater blower does not work at all and I discovered a brand new heater blower motor in the trunk of the car that was purchased by a previous owner. Some of the Bulletin Board posters have suggested reaching up to the fan opening under the dash to see if the fan action can be freed by starting it with a finger push. I will give that a try. Everyone says that accessing the heater and its motor is a royal pain in the _ss, so this job will be put off for a while. 
  16. The air conditioner blower works just fine but apparently the compressor does not and I am sure that it needs a coolant conversion and refill. The crank/compressor pulley belt is not on the car.
  17. Under the car there seems to be a slight leak at the brake pipe joint located near the fuel filter.
  18. The pinion seal on the rear differential appears to be leaking. the casing was quite oily and dirty. 
  19. It is hard to tell at this point, but I am obviously experiencing a pretty good leak from the engine rear main and/or the transmission.
  20. The flex disk or guibo looks to be in satisfactory condition. I don’t see any cracks in the rubber. However, I know that the center driveshaft support bearing and housing is bad and needs to be replaced. Again, a previous owner purchased new items and they are in the trunk of the car. Looks like I get to be the lucky one to replace them!
  21. The welded front muffler bracket that attached to the brace on the transmission has been broken off and is missing completely.
  22. A number of the mounting brackets and clamps (fuel filter, fuel pump, exhaust) located under the car are quite rusty, they are still functioning as they should but look pretty bad.
  23. The rockers or sills on both sides of the car a quite rusty and will need to be repaired/replaced at some point. The front floor boards and the spare tire wheel well have also been patched – probably Bondo. I will need to remove all of that and properly patch with metal.

I am sure that I have only touched the surface of issues with Alfie, but it is a start and gives me a list of parts I need to order and install or repair.

July 10, 2017

70,600 miles on the Odometer

Ignition Update

I am experiencing some starting problems that seem to be due to a partial discharge of the battery after the car has been sitting. Not knowing the car and what others may have changed/updated/disconnected or connected, I thought I would begin by replacing components in the ignition system including the distributor cap, ignition wires, rotor and coil. I ordered these components from Centerline International.https://www.centerlinealfa.com/store

Centerline International Invoice

Old Coil to be Replaced

New Bosch Coil to be Installed

New Bosch Coil to be Installed

 

I began the task by removing the old coil. There are a total of six wires connected to the coil terminals. The (-) terminal has four wires secured to the mounting post with an 8mm nut: a larger cream-colored wire, a white wire with a black tracer, a yellow wire, and a white wire. The (+) terminal has two wires and both of them are light green with black tracers.

Wiring to the Old Coil

Wiring to the Old Coil

To access the mounting bracket nuts for the coil, I found it easier to first remove the coolant recovery tank. This was accomplished by loosening the screw in the bracket connection and then lifting the tank temporarily out of the way.

Coolant Overflow Tank Mounting Bracket

I was then able to remove the old coil and install the new one:

New Bosch Coil Installed

I then carefully marked each ignition wire with a number to designate its location for replacement, and after also marking the old distributor cap for location purposes, I snapped the top off of the black plastic loom to free the wires.

Ignition Wiring Loom Harness

I then disconnected each wire at the spark plugs and popped free the two securing clips on the distributor cap. I could then lift away the old cap and wiring. I had previously disconnected the coil wire while replacing the coil.

The new wiring came with numbers on each wire. After properly locating the wires in the appropriate place on the new distributor cap, I pushed the wires into their seats. This is a tight fit and they were somewhat difficult to fully seat. The coil wire included a rubber cap to press fit over the top of the coil.

New Bosch Distributor Cap

Alfa Spider Ignition Wiring Kit

I then removed the old rotor and installed a new Bosch rotor on the distributor shaft.

New Bosch Rotor

New Bosch Rotor Installed

The new distributor cap and ignition wiring assembly was then reinstalled to the distributor and to each of the spark plugs and to the coil. The coolant recovery bracket was replaced, the coolant tank was restored to its mounted position and the bracket was screwed back together. 

The task was then  completed with a successful test drive.

However, I discovered the next morning that the battery discharge issue remains and I will now begin my sleuthing to try to discover the source of the problem.

Battery Clamp Set

My battery bracket/clamp was pretty rusty and partially consumed by battery acid. I could have replaced it with a universal clamp for considerably less expense, but I chose to purchase and install the proper clamp set from Alfaholics in the UK. https://www.alfaholics.com/parts/105-series/electrical/battery-clamp-set/

Battery Clamp Invoice from Alfaholics

This is an image of the battery clamp set as it was received:

Alfa Battery Bracket

I just did not have the space at our home to keep Alfie and not having the time to work on him, I decided to relocate Alfie to a friend’s shop. After some sleuthing about, it was discovered that the start-up injector in the fuel injection system was not functioning properly and it was replaced. This solved the start-up mystery and the car now starts without any hesitation!

Alfa Introduction

IMG_4571

My 1987 Alfa Romeo Spider Quadrifoglio was acquired by gift! My father decided to pass along his “Alfie” to the next generation. So in July, 2016 I traveled from Virginia to his home in North Carolina and trailered home the newest member of my modest collection of classic cars! I certainly could have driven it, as it is in wonderful condition, but not being really familiar with the car I thought it best to trailer it home. It is nice to now have an Italian joining its British and German stablemates.

Dad with Alfie

Dad with Alfie

Alfie Trailering to Virginia

Alfie Trailering to Virginia

Previous Ownership

It seems that Victoria Hicks purchased Alfie as a new car with 35 miles on the odometer on March 7, 1987 from Robert Rueman, Inc. in Toluca Lake, CA . The cash price (including taxes) of the purchase was $23,451.

Ms. Hicks apparently moved to Connecticut sometime between 1987 and July of 1989. A Bill of Sale confirms the sale of Alfie to Margaret W. and Alfred H. Lupton, IV of Brookfield, CT on June 29, 1989 for $15,000. The car still had a California license plate at the time and the odometer reading was 19,856 miles. An extended warranty from Alfa Romeo, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, NJ was transferred to the Luptons at the time of the sale. Alfie was then registered in Connecticut on August 3, 1989 by the Luptons with 20,456 miles on the odometer. The Connecticut Title is dated August 17, 1989.The Luptons may have been coveting the idea of purchasing a Spider because this ad was found in the folder of materials acquired with the car, dated four days before the Bill of Sale from Ms. Hicks:

NY Times Magazine Alfa Spider ad from 1989

NY Times Magazine Alfa Spider ad from 1989

The Lupton’s also had this New York Times article in the file folder of maintenance records that came with the car. Just an interesting little piece of automotive history!

New York Times article Alfa's 1995 demise in U.S. market

New York Times article Alfa’s 1995 demise in U.S. market

Without more records research, one can only guess when the Lupton’s sold Alfie to the next owner. I have no sales/purchase information about the transfer of ownership, but apparently John Painter acquired the car in around 2010. Service records indicate that Mr. Painter had service completed on Alfie beginning in October 2010 and I have a record of a parts order from him in February 2011.

My father, James R. Rose, III of Banner Elk, NC purchased Alfie from Aurio (Al) Lorenzo in November, 2012. At the time, the car had approximately 69,300 miles on the odometer. I do not know when Mr. Lorenzo purchased the car, but it was shipped from Performance Imports in Danbury, CT by RAD Transport to his address in Gibsonville, NC. Unfortunately, there is no date on the shipping manifest. The earliest receipt for parts/service that I have in his name is dated May 1, 2012. The last service/parts purchase by Mr. Lorenzo for which I have a record is dated from September, 2012.

My dad enjoyed Alfie until the summer of 2016, when in July he passed him along to me. There were 70,404 miles showing on the odometer at the time of the transfer.

Oh, don’t be worried about my father. He may be ninety, but he still has a 12 cylinder, 1990 Jaguar XJS and a beautiful little VW Beetle to keep him occupied:

1990 Jaguar XJS

1990 Jaguar XJS

1969 VW

1969 VW

Update as of January 1, 2021

Because of my all-consuming restoration of the Jaguar MK2, Alfie received very little attention. He was stored in nice garage space and was started and driven around from time to time, but that was about it. My wife and I relocated from Virginia to Florida in May, 2018 and the car remained in Virginia. I am now ready to give Alfie the attention she deserves and will transport her to our home in Florida within the next few weeks. My Dad is now 94 and the VW has been adopted by a younger brother and the Jag has been sold.

Maintenance Records

Fortunately, Alfie came with a pretty thick file folder of maintenance records dating from the original owner. It is always nice to have these records to have an idea of the degree to which a car has been properly maintained throughout its life. A chronological summary of the service invoices through my father’s ownership is provided here: 1987 Alfa Romeo Spider Maintenance History – Sheet1

I will now maintain service records and parts and maintenance invoices in a separate file to document activity during my ownership.